Now Playing
Magic 102.1 FM
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
Magic 102.1 FM

local

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >

Police working to ID woman who collapsed, died in road

Atlanta police are working to identify a woman found dead near Interstate 75/85 and Langford Parkway in southeast Atlanta.

Channel 2's Audrey Washington spoke to police as they tried to figure out how the person got there.

Atlanta police said officers responded to a report of a person down call just before 2 a.m. Thursday. 

When officers got there, they met with two drivers who said they had seen someone having trouble walking in the road and pulled over to help them.

They said the woman then collapsed.

Police said Grady EMS arrived and said she was dead.

We're talking to investigators as they try to figure out what happened to the woman, for updates on Channel 2 Action News at Noon.

TRENDING STORIES:

Guilty or Not? Tex McIver jury deliberations continue Man charged with arson in stable fire that killed 24 horses 'Armed and dangerous man' on the loose after killing wife, sheriff says

Her injuries were consistent with being struck by a vehicle, Atlanta police Capt. Andrew Senzer said.

Police said they believe the woman is between the ages of 25 and 35 years old.

Police on scene said they noticed that there are no apartments or homes nearby, so they said they do not know why she was in the road.

“You have 75/85 that splits with Langford Parkway and that loops around, it’s a lot of twists and turns over here, very dark, but we don’t know why the pedestrian was on the roadway,” Senzer said.

If the woman was hit by a car, police will then start searching for the hit-and-run driver.

Police working to ID woman who collapsed, died in road

Atlanta police are working to identify a woman found dead near Interstate 75/85 and Langford Parkway in southeast Atlanta.

Channel 2's Audrey Washington spoke to police as they tried to figure out how the person got there.

Atlanta police said officers responded to a report of a person down call just before 2 a.m. Thursday. 

When officers got there, they met with two drivers who said they had seen someone having trouble walking in the road and pulled over to help them.

They said the woman then collapsed.

Police said Grady EMS arrived and said she was dead.

We're talking to investigators as they try to figure out what happened to the woman, for updates on Channel 2 Action News at Noon.

TRENDING STORIES:

Guilty or Not? Tex McIver jury deliberations continue Man charged with arson in stable fire that killed 24 horses 'Armed and dangerous man' on the loose after killing wife, sheriff says

Her injuries were consistent with being struck by a vehicle, Atlanta police Capt. Andrew Senzer said.

Police said they believe the woman is between the ages of 25 and 35 years old.

Police on scene said they noticed that there are no apartments or homes nearby, so they said they do not know why she was in the road.

“You have 75/85 that splits with Langford Parkway and that loops around, it’s a lot of twists and turns over here, very dark, but we don’t know why the pedestrian was on the roadway,” Senzer said.

If the woman was hit by a car, police will then start searching for the hit-and-run driver.

Bus drivers plan 'sick out' for next 3 days

Some bus drivers are already on their routes, while others plan to call out sick today, and for two more days.

Thursday is day 1 of a three-day planned 'sick out' by bus drivers in DeKalb County.

DeKalb County school officials want parents to be alert that some bus drivers may not be reporting to work over the next three days.

In an email sent to parents, the school district says a walkout is expected this week and the district has a contingency plan in place. The email states DeKalb County Schools Superintendent Dr. R. Stephen Green has been meeting with drivers and is working to address their concerns.

It's a disruption that the president of Driver and Monitor Advisory Committee hopes this will get them to the bargaining table with Green.

"We want a 6 percent step increase. We want to get back to the step raises. We want to get back to having the cost of living. We want benefits. We just want to be treated like everyone else," said Shiela Bennett, a DeKalb County school bus driver.

We'll bring you the latest on the proposed 'sick out' on Channel 2 Action News at Noon.

TRENDING STORIES:

Guilty or Not? Tex McIver jury deliberations continue Man charged with arson in stable fire that killed 24 horses 'Armed and dangerous man' on the loose after killing wife, sheriff says

But the next three days could place a significant burden on families. 

"A lot of people leave early for work. A lot of people already depend on others and with the bus drivers. Not showing up for work is really going to impact a lot of families," said Ashley Ford, a parent of a student at a DeKalb County school. 

There will be no consequences to students if they arrive late as a result of the walkout.

If a student misses a test or is late, the district says it will work to find time for the child to take the tests. 

If any parent has transportation questions, they are advised to call the DeKalb County School District hotline at 678-676-1200.  

A school bus driver strike called a “sick out” is planned for Thursday, Friday, and Monday. Drivers tell me they will call out sick in a move to get to get pay raise negotiations started. pic.twitter.com/ylNsi8MuTl — Carl Willis (@CarlWillisWSB) April 19, 2018

Barbara Bush Foundation's literacy efforts reached deep into Georgia

Barbara Bush was jogging in a Houston park thinking about how she could best contribute to the nation if she became first lady.

As the story goes, she realized many problems such as homelessness, crime, hunger and addiction could be alleviated if more people were able to read, write and comprehend language.

Today, many Georgia educators and nonprofit leaders credit Bush with raising the bar of literacy efforts across the state.

[READ: Funeral arrangements announced for former first lady Barbara Bush]

“Making literacy a key priority set an expectation,” said Arianne B. Weldon, director of the Get Georgia Reading Campaign, a statewide effort  to get all children reading proficiently by the end of the third grade. “Literacy is a key to a successful society.”

In 1989, Bush created the Tallahassee-based Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy , which has provided grants to programs and schools serving metro Atlanta, Dublin and Savannah.

Bush, the wife and mother of former presidents, died at her home in Texas Tuesday at age 92.

Since its founding,  the foundation has raised and provided more than $110 million to help create or expand family literacy programs in the nation, according to its website.

[PHOTOS: Barbara Bush through the years]

Jackie Curtis, executive director of Communities in Schools of Laurens County, runs one such program. Curtis said Bush’s influence cannot be overstated.

In 2006, Curtis’ nonprofit received $65,000 to start a program for teenage mothers who had dropped out of high school. The program helped the teens earn their GEDs and provided childcare.

“I think history will prove that her impact on literacy was probably more far-reaching than her position as first lady and the mother of a president,” said Curtis. 

Today, many Georgia educators and nonprofit leaders credit Bush with raising the bar of literacy efforts across the state.

[READ: Things to know about Barbara Bush]

“Making literacy a key priority set an expectation,” said Arianne B. Weldon, director of the Get Georgia Reading Campaign, a statewide effort  to get all children reading proficiently by the end of the third grade. “Literacy is a key to a successful society.”

In 1989 Bush created the Tallahassee-based Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy, which has provided grants to programs and schools serving metro Atlanta, Dublin and Savannah.

Bush, the wife and mother of former presidents, died at her home in Texas Tuesday at age 92.

Since its founding,  the foundation has raised and provided more than $110 million to help create or expand family literacy programs in the nation, according to its website.

[READ: Former President George HW Bush buoyed by tributes to wife]

Jackie Curtis, executive director of Communities in Schools of Laurens County, runs one such program. Curtis said Bush’s influence cannot be overstated.

In 2006, Curtis’ nonprofit received $65,000 to start a program for teenage mothers who had dropped out of high school. The program helped the teens earn their GEDs and provided childcare.

“I think history will prove that her impact on literacy was probably more far-reaching than her position as first lady and the mother of a president,” said Curtis. 

Over the past several years, the foundation transitioned from a grant-making organization to funding innovative programs and strategies such as “Talk With Me Baby.”

[READ: World War II love letter between presidential couple shows their long connection]

In 2016, the  Barbara Bush foundation made a $100,000 grant to the “ Talk With Me Baby,” program developed at Emory University to launch its training toolkit nationally.

The partnership includes the Marcus Autism Center at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University’s Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta Speech School, the Get Georgia Reading Campaign, the Georgia Department of Public Health, and the Georgia Department of Education.

Laura Hauser, literacy services officer at the DeKalb County Public Library, also praised Bush. The Barbara Bush Foundation named the library as one of   the programs that it supported.

[READ: Family, love, life: Barbara Bush's most memorable quotes]

Bush successfully used “the platform she had to support literacy awareness,” said Hauser. “Literacy is more than reading. It’s the ability to write and speak in English and use math. It allows people to sustain themselves. It’s something we can all get behind.”

Studies have shown that the earlier children learn to read, write and comprehend, the greater their chances of graduating from high school, competing in the workplace and earning a living wage. It also gives them a solid foundation to learn other skill sets.

Bush served as honorary chair of the foundation until 2012, when she passed the leadership mantle to her daughter, Dorothy “Doro” Bush Koch.

Barbara Bush Foundation's literacy efforts reached deep into Georgia

Barbara Bush was jogging in a Houston park thinking about how she could best contribute to the nation if she became first lady.

As the story goes, she realized many problems such as homelessness, crime, hunger and addiction could be alleviated if more people were able to read, write and comprehend language.

Today, many Georgia educators and nonprofit leaders credit Bush with raising the bar of literacy efforts across the state.

[READ: Funeral arrangements announced for former first lady Barbara Bush]

“Making literacy a key priority set an expectation,” said Arianne B. Weldon, director of the Get Georgia Reading Campaign, a statewide effort  to get all children reading proficiently by the end of the third grade. “Literacy is a key to a successful society.”

In 1989, Bush created the Tallahassee-based Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy , which has provided grants to programs and schools serving metro Atlanta, Dublin and Savannah.

Bush, the wife and mother of former presidents, died at her home in Texas Tuesday at age 92.

Since its founding,  the foundation has raised and provided more than $110 million to help create or expand family literacy programs in the nation, according to its website.

[PHOTOS: Barbara Bush through the years]

Jackie Curtis, executive director of Communities in Schools of Laurens County, runs one such program. Curtis said Bush’s influence cannot be overstated.

In 2006, Curtis’ nonprofit received $65,000 to start a program for teenage mothers who had dropped out of high school. The program helped the teens earn their GEDs and provided childcare.

“I think history will prove that her impact on literacy was probably more far-reaching than her position as first lady and the mother of a president,” said Curtis. 

Today, many Georgia educators and nonprofit leaders credit Bush with raising the bar of literacy efforts across the state.

[READ: Things to know about Barbara Bush]

“Making literacy a key priority set an expectation,” said Arianne B. Weldon, director of the Get Georgia Reading Campaign, a statewide effort  to get all children reading proficiently by the end of the third grade. “Literacy is a key to a successful society.”

In 1989 Bush created the Tallahassee-based Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy, which has provided grants to programs and schools serving metro Atlanta, Dublin and Savannah.

Bush, the wife and mother of former presidents, died at her home in Texas Tuesday at age 92.

Since its founding,  the foundation has raised and provided more than $110 million to help create or expand family literacy programs in the nation, according to its website.

[READ: Former President George HW Bush buoyed by tributes to wife]

Jackie Curtis, executive director of Communities in Schools of Laurens County, runs one such program. Curtis said Bush’s influence cannot be overstated.

In 2006, Curtis’ nonprofit received $65,000 to start a program for teenage mothers who had dropped out of high school. The program helped the teens earn their GEDs and provided childcare.

“I think history will prove that her impact on literacy was probably more far-reaching than her position as first lady and the mother of a president,” said Curtis. 

Over the past several years, the foundation transitioned from a grant-making organization to funding innovative programs and strategies such as “Talk With Me Baby.”

[READ: World War II love letter between presidential couple shows their long connection]

In 2016, the  Barbara Bush foundation made a $100,000 grant to the “ Talk With Me Baby,” program developed at Emory University to launch its training toolkit nationally.

The partnership includes the Marcus Autism Center at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University’s Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta Speech School, the Get Georgia Reading Campaign, the Georgia Department of Public Health, and the Georgia Department of Education.

Laura Hauser, literacy services officer at the DeKalb County Public Library, also praised Bush. The Barbara Bush Foundation named the library as one of   the programs that it supported.

[READ: Family, love, life: Barbara Bush's most memorable quotes]

Bush successfully used “the platform she had to support literacy awareness,” said Hauser. “Literacy is more than reading. It’s the ability to write and speak in English and use math. It allows people to sustain themselves. It’s something we can all get behind.”

Studies have shown that the earlier children learn to read, write and comprehend, the greater their chances of graduating from high school, competing in the workplace and earning a living wage. It also gives them a solid foundation to learn other skill sets.

Bush served as honorary chair of the foundation until 2012, when she passed the leadership mantle to her daughter, Dorothy “Doro” Bush Koch.

Smoke from engine causes plane to turn around at Atlanta airport

The Atlanta airport says a plane had to turn around before take-off after passengers noticed smoke coming from an engine.

Shortly after 6pm, smoke was reported coming from the engine of a departing aircraft. The aircraft immediately returned to ATL....1/2— Atlanta Airport (@ATLairport) April 18, 2018

Viewers sent in video of airport fire crews hosing down the engine of the Delta plane. 

....ARFF units hosed down the aircraft’s smoking engine. The aircraft is being towed, w pax aboard, back to the concourse. 2/2— Atlanta Airport (@ATLairport) April 18, 2018

The airport says there are no injuries reported. 

There are no reports of injuries, and there is minimal impact to operations.— Atlanta Airport (@ATLairport) April 18, 2018

Firefighters towed the plane back to the concourse to look into what caused the engine problems.

Delta sent a statement to Channel 2 Action News saying:

"Delta flight 30 from Atlanta to London returned to Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport on Wednesday after an issue with its number 2 engine. The flight landed without incident and airport response vehicles met the aircraft upon arrival. The airplane was towed to the gate, where customers deplaned through the jetway and will be accommodated on a different aircraft. The safety of our customers and crew is always our top priority and we apologize to our customers on this flight."

The airport says there was minimal impact on the operations at Hartsfield-Jackson International.

BREAKING: A plane has returned to Hartsfield-Jackson #Atlanta International Airport after smoke was reported coming from the engine. Channel 2 viewers sent us photos and videos of the plane on the runway. pic.twitter.com/7dO2tOvLU0 — WSB-TV (@wsbtv) April 18, 2018

Smoke from engine causes plane to turn around at Atlanta airport

The Atlanta airport says a plane had to turn around before take-off after passengers noticed smoke coming from an engine.

Shortly after 6pm, smoke was reported coming from the engine of a departing aircraft. The aircraft immediately returned to ATL....1/2— Atlanta Airport (@ATLairport) April 18, 2018

Viewers sent in video of airport fire crews hosing down the engine of the Delta plane. 

....ARFF units hosed down the aircraft’s smoking engine. The aircraft is being towed, w pax aboard, back to the concourse. 2/2— Atlanta Airport (@ATLairport) April 18, 2018

The airport says there are no injuries reported. 

There are no reports of injuries, and there is minimal impact to operations.— Atlanta Airport (@ATLairport) April 18, 2018

Firefighters towed the plane back to the concourse to look into what caused the engine problems.

Delta sent a statement to Channel 2 Action News saying:

"Delta flight 30 from Atlanta to London returned to Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport on Wednesday after an issue with its number 2 engine. The flight landed without incident and airport response vehicles met the aircraft upon arrival. The airplane was towed to the gate, where customers deplaned through the jetway and will be accommodated on a different aircraft. The safety of our customers and crew is always our top priority and we apologize to our customers on this flight."

The airport says there was minimal impact on the operations at Hartsfield-Jackson International.

BREAKING: A plane has returned to Hartsfield-Jackson #Atlanta International Airport after smoke was reported coming from the engine. Channel 2 viewers sent us photos and videos of the plane on the runway. pic.twitter.com/7dO2tOvLU0 — WSB-TV (@wsbtv) April 18, 2018

New bill would allow the VA to study the effectiveness of medical marijuana

Lawmakers are taking a major new step towards allowing veterans suffering from PTSD and chronic pain to have access to medical marijuana.

Federal law currently prevents the Department of Veterans Affairs from even studying the effects of pot.

The Trump administration has said this is out of their hands. Federal law prevents even exploring the medical benefits of marijuana. 

Now, there's a plan to change that.

Not only can VA doctors and psychiatrists not prescribe marijuana, they can't even study it to see if it might help vets with PTSD or major injuries.

"The biggest absurdity in all this is we pass out opioids like Tic Tacs but we don't want anyone to study the effects of marijuana," said Washington Congressman Adam Smith.

TRENDING STORIES:

Guilty or Not? Tex McIver jury deliberations continue Man charged with arson in stable fire that killed 24 horses 'Armed and dangerous man' on the loose after killing wife, sheriff says The VA said its hands are tied. A spokesman said:  Under current law, the opportunities for VA to conduct marijuana research are limited because of the restrictions imposed by federal law. Now this week, more than 30 members of Congress including the top Republican and Democrat on the VA committee are introducing a bill to allow federal research into medical marijuana and to order the VA to do it. Smith is the ranking member of the Armed Services Committee. "It needs to be studied cause there's people who need help its not just in va but its a good place to start," Smith said. When we talked to President Trump's now former VA Secretary David Shulkin last year. He said this about medical marijuana: "This isn't about people's political views or personal views. This is about are there ways we can be helping people with problems that are effecting their lives so of course i'm open to," he said.  

Cancer survivor thanks governor for stepping in on deal between BCBS and Piedmont Health

A day after Gov. Nathan Deal announced a “handshake agreement” from both Blue Cross/Blue Shield and Piedmont Healthcare in an ongoing contract dispute, there still is no signed final contract between the two sides.  

That leaves close to 600,000 people, mostly state employees, with doctors who could be out-of-network.

Blue Cross/Blue Shield and Piedmont Healthcare have been in negotiations for months, but their contract lapsed April 1, prompting the governor to step in to try and get both sides to reach an agreement.  

After a Monday meeting between him and the CEO’s of both companies failed to reach that agreement, Deal threatened “executive action” if the two sides couldn’t come together.

Wednesday, he tweeted that he finally had a “handshake agreement” from both Blue Cross/Blue Shield and Piedmont Healthcare, providing hope for many state employees and their families.

TRENDING STORIES:

Guilty or Not? Tex McIver jury deliberations continue Man charged with arson in stable fire that killed 24 horses 'Armed and dangerous man' on the loose after killing wife, sheriff says “It’s just so relieving to know that the governor stepped in on our behalf,” said Neda Abghari of Dunwoody. Abghari’s husband is a state employee, and they are both on the state health benefit plan. Abghari is a cancer survivor and new mother. Doctors declared her cancer-free, but she still needs one more round of treatments before she is done. Ten days before giving birth to her daughter, she learned that because of the contract dispute, her cancer doctors were out of network.  “The patients all pay their premiums on time,” said Abghari. “We do what we’re supposed to do on our end, and then to have the rug pulled out from under us? It’s not okay.” Abghari thanked Deal for his actions and hopes the final contracts will be signed soon. “We’re not in a situation to be able to have that pull,” Abghari said. "I was so relieved when I heard that he was putting his foot down.” Officials with the governor's office said they were confident an agreement would be reached soon.

Bus drivers plan 'sick out' for next 3 days

Some bus drivers are already on their routes, while others plan to call out sick today, and for two more days.

Thursday is day 1 of a three-day planned 'sick out' by bus drivers in DeKalb County.

DeKalb County school officials want parents to be alert that some bus drivers may not be reporting to work over the next three days.

In an email sent to parents, the school district says a walkout is expected this week and the district has a contingency plan in place. The email states DeKalb County Schools Superintendent Dr. R. Stephen Green has been meeting with drivers and is working to address their concerns.

It's a disruption that the president of Driver and Monitor Advisory Committee hopes this will get them to the bargaining table with Green.

"We want a 6 percent step increase. We want to get back to the step raises. We want to get back to having the cost of living. We want benefits. We just want to be treated like everyone else," said Shiela Bennett, a DeKalb County school bus driver.

We'll bring you the latest on the proposed 'sick out' on Channel 2 Action News at Noon.

TRENDING STORIES:

Guilty or Not? Tex McIver jury deliberations continue Man charged with arson in stable fire that killed 24 horses 'Armed and dangerous man' on the loose after killing wife, sheriff says

But the next three days could place a significant burden on families. 

"A lot of people leave early for work. A lot of people already depend on others and with the bus drivers. Not showing up for work is really going to impact a lot of families," said Ashley Ford, a parent of a student at a DeKalb County school. 

There will be no consequences to students if they arrive late as a result of the walkout.

If a student misses a test or is late, the district says it will work to find time for the child to take the tests. 

If any parent has transportation questions, they are advised to call the DeKalb County School District hotline at 678-676-1200.  

A school bus driver strike called a “sick out” is planned for Thursday, Friday, and Monday. Drivers tell me they will call out sick in a move to get to get pay raise negotiations started. pic.twitter.com/ylNsi8MuTl — Carl Willis (@CarlWillisWSB) April 19, 2018
200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >