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John McCain reveals increasingly worrisome health prognosis

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) offered insight into his struggle with an aggressive brain cancer diagnosis Sunday night on CBS’ “60 Minutes,” saying doctors have not given him a good prognosis.

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One estimate puts his chance of survival in the single-digit percentile, he said.

“It’s very, very serious ... Some say 3 percent, some say 14 percent,” he said. “You know, it’s ... it’s a very poor prognosis.”

McCain, 81, said that despite the grim news, he was happy to have lived a wonderful life.

A former naval aviator shot down over North Vietnam in 1967 and held as a prisoner of war until 1973, McCain said he wants to be remembered for his service to his country and he wants his memorial service to be held in Annapolis, Maryland, at his alma mater, the U.S. Naval Academy.

Though his health may be failing, McCain remains dedicated to service and America, he said, especially in the current political climate, where he has become a dissenting Republican voice on health care. Fixing health care may ultimately mean McCain will have to work with President Donald Trump, though the two have repeatedly clashed, the senator acknowledged.

“I’d be glad to converse with him. But I also understand that we’re very different people. Different upbringing. Different life experiences,” McCain told CBS. “He is in the business of making money ... I was raised in the concept and belief that duty, honor, country is the lodestar for the behavior that we have to exhibit every single day.”

Florida woman pulls gun, uses racial slur in road rage incident

Florida authorities have charged a 22-year-old woman in a road rage incident earlier this month.

Savanah Huffman is accused of pulling out a gun, pointing it at another driver in traffic and using a racial slur to tell the other driver she would kill her, according to Palm Beach County deputies.

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On Sept. 13, Huffman was driving in suburban West Palm Beach, when she allegedly pulled out a gun and pointed it at the driver of a Toyota Tacoma. The driver of the truck, a 52-year-old woman, later told investigators she had no idea why the woman pulled the gun out and pointed it or said she would kill her, using a racial slur.

According to the report, Huffman admitted to the road rage incident but gave no reason for singling out the woman.

Another driver who witnessed the incident called 911 and followed Huffman to her house to get her tag number.

When deputies arrived at the home, Huffman let deputies search her vehicle. Inside, they found an unloaded 9 mm pistol under the passenger seat, according to the report.

>> Related: 18-wheeler and SUV caught on camera in road-rage incident

Huffman was arrested on charges of of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and improper exhibition of a firearm.

She was jailed in Palm Beach County and later released on $15,000 bond.

Steelers fans burn memorabilia over national anthem stance

The Pittsburgh Steelers didn’t take to the field Sunday as the national anthem played before the team faced the Chicago Bears, and that decision isn’t sitting well with some fans.

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Steelers fans across America posted videos on social media showing them burning their memorabilia after the team failed to show up for the anthem. The protest comes amid tension between NFL players, who first started taking a knee during the anthem last year in protest of inequality and police violence, and President Donald Trump, who called the protests disrespectful.

>> Related: Trump slams NFL players for national anthem protests, athletes react

Jim Heaney, a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps, posted on YouTube and said, “Can't come out and stand for our anthem or flag? I'm done with you. #BoycottPittsburghSteelers #BoycottTheNFL.”

6 ways you might be disrespecting the flag without even knowing it

How and when the U.S. flag and national anthem should be publicly respected and honored has become the matter of much debate and consternation, but what does the law say?

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It’s actually easier than you think to disrespect the Star-Spangled Banner, at least according the sometimes-obscure U.S. Flag Code.

The rules went into effect on the very first Flag Day — June 14, 1923 — but fell out of the spotlight until recently. Title 36, Chapter 10 of the United States Code, listed as “Patriotic Customs,” is quite specific and straightforward when it comes to what you should and should not do with the flag and during the national anthem, including what “respecting the flag” entails.

Most Americans know by heart at least a few of the 11 “respect for the flag” rules listed under Section 176. Never letting the flag touch the ground or water and only displaying the stars and stripes upside-down as a serious distress signal qualify as fairly common knowledge. But who knew about the part of the law that says the flag should never be used to cover the ceiling?

Here are some common ways the flag is disrespected every day, according to the federal code:

1.

“The flag should never be used as wearing apparel, bedding, or drapery.” So that’s going to be a no to American flag bikinis, bedspreads and curtains.

2.

“The flag should never be used for advertising purposes in any manner whatsoever.” The law is the law, even for iconic American brands.

3.

“It should not be embroidered on such articles as cushions or handkerchiefs and the like, printed or otherwise impressed on paper napkins or boxes or anything that is designed for temporary use and discard.” Fourth of July picnics can be just as delicious without the star-spangled napkins and paper plates.

4.

“No part of the flag should ever be used as a costume or athletic uniform. However, a flag patch may be affixed to the uniform of military personnel, firemen, policemen and members of patriotic organizations. The flag represents a living country and is itself considered a living thing. Therefore, the lapel flag pin being a replica, should be worn on the left lapel near the heart.” It would seem even well-intended patriotism can put sports teams on the wrong side of the law.

5.

“It is the universal custom to display the flag only from sunrise to sunset on buildings and on stationary flagstaffs in the open. However, when a patriotic effect is desired, the flag may be displayed 24 hours a day if properly illuminated during the hours of darkness. The flag should not be displayed on days when the weather is inclement, except when an all-weather flag is displayed.”

6.

Incidentally, the law is also pretty straightforward when it comes to what’s expected of Americans when the national anthem is played, given that the anthem is typically accompanied by a display of the flag. If the flag is being displayed, “all present except those in uniform should stand at attention facing the flag with the right hand over the heart,” and those not in uniform should remove their hats, holding them at the left shoulder, which would put your hand over your heart. Those in uniform salute the flag for the entire song. If there’s no flag on display, everyone is supposed to face wherever the music is coming from and conduct themselves as if the flag is on display there. Kneeling, sitting or otherwise sitting out the anthem is not addressed in the law as illegal or otherwise.

Here’s the truth on whether NFL rules require players to stand for the national anthem

After Donald Trump inserted himself into the national anthem protest debate, there’s been plenty of conversation on whether teams were breaking NFL rules by protesting.

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Here’s what is currently circulating on Facebook and other platforms.

“The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the NFL League Rulebook. It states:“The national anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the national anthem.

“During the national anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition…

…It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the national anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”

>> Related: Live updates: Trump slams NFL players for national anthem protests, athletes react

Here’s what the 2017 official NFL rulebook says.

As for being on the field ahead of the start of the game, there’s no mention of the national anthem or requirement to stand for it. There is a requirement for teams to be on the field 10 minutes prior to the kickoff. That means teams that stayed in the locker room Sunday, typically had ample time to make their way to the field.

“SECTION 2 STARTING A PERIOD OR HALF

ARTICLE 1. KICKOFF ON SCHEDULE. Both teams must be on the field to kick off at the scheduled time for the start of each half. Prior to the start of the game, both teams are required to appear on the field at least 10 minutes prior to the scheduled kickoff in order to ensure sufficient time for proper warm-up. Designated members of the officiating crew must notify both head coaches personally of the scheduled time for kickoff prior to the start of each half.”

Here is the only real policy on political statements and NFL standards, via the official rulebook.

>> Related: Roger Goodell calls Trump’s attack on NFL players’ protests ‘divisive’

“SECTION 4 EQUIPMENT, UNIFORMS, PLAYER APPEARANCE

ARTICLE 8. PERSONAL MESSAGES. Throughout the period on game-day that a player is visible to the stadium and television audience (including in pregame warm-ups, in the bench area, and during postgame interviews in the locker room or on the field), players are prohibited from wearing, displaying, or otherwise conveying personal messages either in writing or illustration, unless such message has been approved in advance by the League office. Items to celebrate anniversaries or memorable events, or to honor or commemorate individuals, such as helmet decals, and arm bands and jersey patches on players’ uniforms, are prohibited unless approved in advance by the League office. All such items approved by the League office, if any, must relate to team or League events or personages. The League will not grant permission for any club or player to wear, display, or otherwise convey messages, through helmet decals, arm bands, jersey patches, or other items affixed to game uniforms or equipment, which relate to political activities or causes, other non-football events, causes or campaigns, or charitable causes or campaigns. Further, any such approved items must be modest in size, tasteful, non-commercial, and non- controversial; must not be worn for more than one football season; and if approved for use by a specific team, must not be worn by players on other teams in the League.”

>> Related: WWII veteran, 97, kneels in support of NFL’s national anthem protests

So that means the players who wore “I’m with Kap” shirts could have broken NFL rules if the league did not approve them ahead of time. 

>> Related: NASCAR owners threaten to fire those who protest during national anthem

The league could have also taken action at kneeling during the anthem as a form of protest if it deemed it conveying a personal message through illustration. It’s quite clear that the NFL won’t do so at this time.

Jared Kushner used personal email to conduct White House business, lawyer says

Jared Kushner, President Donald Trump’s son-in-law and a senior White House adviser, used a personal email account to discuss official government business, despite his father-in-law’s criticism of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton for doing the same, according to multiple reports.

>> Read more trending news

The email account was set up in December, Politico reported, noting that Kushner also uses an official White House email account. The news site was the first to report on Kushner’s use of private email.

“Fewer than 100 emails from January through August were either sent to or returned by Mr. Kushner to colleagues in the White House from his personal email account,” Kushner’s lawyer, Abbe Lowell, said Sunday in a statement to Politico. “These usually forwarded news articles or political commentary and most often occurred when someone initiated the exchange by sending an email to his personal rather than his White House address.”

Trump, who faced Clinton last year in the race for the White House, criticized the former secretary of state numerous times for her use of private email, leading supporters on chants of “Lock her up” and insisting that her actions were illegal. The FBI determined last year that Clinton did not break the law, although then-FBI Director James Comey said that Clinton and her colleagues were "extremely careless in their handling of very sensitive, highly classified information.”

Politico reported that there were no indications that Kushner used his private email account to discuss sensitive or classified information.

An unidentified government official told The New York Times that “unlike in the Clinton case, Mr. Kushner had not set up a private server to house the personal email account. While Mrs. Clinton used her personal account exclusively, the official said that Mr. Kushner does use his government account.”

At a news briefing on Monday, White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said that, to her knowledge, Kushner’s use of private email was “very limited.”

“White House counsel has instructed all White House staff to use their government email for government matters,” she said, adding that staff was “instructed on this one pretty regularly.”

Government officials are required to keep records of their correspondence under federal law. Lowell told the Times that all White House-related emails were forwarded to Kusner’s official government address in order to create a record of the correspondence.

Monster alligator is catch of a lifetime for Louisiana fisherman 

After days of fishing with nothing to show for it, a Louisiana man was dumbfounded when he hauled in the catch of a lifetime: a massive alligator measuring 12 feet 1 inches long.

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Fisherman Mark David Jr. was about to throw in the towel last week on Anacoco Lake, west of Leesville, when he discovered the monster gator on one of his hooks.

“I’m no gator expert,” Davis told The Leesville Daily Leader. “We’ve caught a few gators out of Anacoco Lake before, but never this big.”

Davis said it was a struggle getting the reptile back to shore and an even bigger struggle getting the animal on his truck. It took six people in the end to get the massive gator onto Davis’ truck.

>> Related: Alligator attacks man wading in river with daughters, suffered severe bite injury

 

Woman allegedly held up at airport because no one believed how old she was

A woman said she was stopped by airport security because no one believed she was as old as her ID said she was.

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Ukrainian singer Natalia Dzenkiv, 41, was asked to present her ID at a Turkish airport, but her youthful looks led airport security to believe that she had presented a false ID. Security pulled her into a room and questioned her.

“When I found out the reason for my arrest, I even started laughing, as it was the age in my passport,” she said, according to Lad Bible. “I am already used to compliments about the way I look, but I couldn’t have imagined that it might be a reason for detaining me.”

After a few fans of Dzenkiv’s band, Lama, recognized her in the airport and asked for an autograph, security to let her through.

Lama won the award for Best Ukrainian Act MTV’s Europe Music Awards in 2007.

Usher hailed as ‘hero’ after stopping church shooter

Friends know Robert Engle by his middle name, Caleb.

He’s tall, kind and considerate of others. 

Engle, 22, was an usher Sunday at Burnette Chapel Church of Christ, where he has attended since he was a child, when a masked gunman walked in and started firing indiscriminately at the 42 parishioners.

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"I've been going to this church my whole life,” Engle said. “I would have never, ever thought something like this would have happened."

Emanuel Kidega Samson, 25, fatally shot a woman in the parking lot before entering the church where he shot six more people. Engle was pistol-whipped by Samson while trying to stop the gunman as he entered the church. Engle, who has a permit to carry, went to the parking lot and retrieved his gun. He ran back into church where he tackled and held Samson at gunpoint until police arrived. 

“I ask everyone to pray for the victims, family members of the victims, our church community. Please pray for healing,” Engle said in a statement. “Also, please pray for the shooter, the shooter’s family and friends. They are hurting as well.” 

The six people injured suffered life-threatening injuries. Samson also shot himself, although it was unclear whether it was on purpose or accident. He was treated for the gunshot wound to his chest and released into police custody. He was charged with murder.

Engle was treated at the hospital and released Sunday night. Law enforcement officials called him “an extraordinarily brave individual.”

“He’s the hero,” Metro Nashville police Chief Steve Anderson said during a news conference. “He’s the person who stopped this madness.”

But Engle eschews being called a hero.

“I do not want to be labeled a hero,” Engle said in a statement. “The real heroes are the police, first responders, medical staff and doctors who have helped me and everyone affected.” 

Engle’s grandmother said she’s proud of him.

“He’s just someone who care about a lot of people,” Rheta Engle told the Tennessean. “He has all their feeling at heart.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Could flood-ravaged Houston become jackpot spot for HGTV?

The thousands of flood-damaged homes across southeast Texas could bring a boom to at least one Lone Star industry.

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Some real estate investors are counseling buyers to purchase homes damaged by Hurricane Harvey, pay for the repairs and then resell them, according to Reuters.

These property “flippers,” as they’re known in the industry, expect to take advantage of a tight housing market, especially in Houston, to reap a potentially substantial profit, Reuters reported.

Ray Sasser, a real estate investor and advisor, followed a similar plan advisors are currently reemploying to attract the home front venturers when Tropical Storm Allison struck Houston in 2001.

He bought several homes -- some for as low as 30 percent of their market value -- selling many of them a year later at full market price.

RELATED: Houston suburb tops best value neighborhoods list

At a recent Houston real estate seminar, Sasser revealed his plan to purchase 50 flooded homes for pennies on the dollar, invest 15 to 20 percent for repairs, aiming to then turn them back onto the market in a short time.

With an estimated 268,000 homes suffering some damage due to the floods, what was a tragedy for a significant number of Houstonian homeowners may be a lucrative opportunity for eager flippers.

Many homeowners may consider walking away from their damaged homes with whatever cash they can get, so flippers can buy properties at near-record-low levels.

Meanwhile, the tight nationwide housing market, combined with Houston’s diverse economy and growing population, are creating ideal conditions for flippers to find buyers.

As new homes go up on the old sites, flippers may also be looking at quick sales for prices at or near full market value.

RELATED: Some Houston neighborhoods better for investment return than others

For homeowners looking to sell their damaged homes, the Better Business Bureau posted some advice on how to avoid scams on its website, including the following:

  • Checking if the company has a local office
  • Meeting in person at the buyer’s office to learn about their processes
  • Avoiding paying any “application fees” or “processing fees”
  • Contacting the buyer’s lender to see if they have the funds to complete the purchase
  • Examining the contract to ensure that the seller is no longer obligated to make mortgage payments

Read more at Reuters.

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