Now Playing
Magic 102.1 FM
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
Magic 102.1 FM

education

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >

James Comey to teach ethical leadership course at College of William & Mary

Former FBI Director James Comey will teach an ethical leadership course for his alma mater, Virginia’s College of William & Mary, starting in the fall, the school announced Friday.

>> Read more trending news

Comey, who was dismissed as director of the FBI by President Donald Trump in May 2017, was named an executive professor in education at William & Mary on Friday. School officials said he will teach ethical leadership during the fall 2018, spring 2019 and summer 2019 semesters with Drew Stelljes, an executive assistant professor of education and assistant vice president for student leadership at William & Mary.

“Our students will benefit significantly from his experience and wisdom,” William & Mary President Taylor Reveley said in a news release. “He understands to the core of his being that our leaders must have an abiding commitment to ethical behavior and sacrificial service if we are to have good government.”

>> Related: Comey told Trump 3 times he was not under investigation

The course will be taught predominantly in Washington, D.C., at the William & Mary Washington Center, school officials said. One class will be live-streamed to students in Washington, D.C., and taught at the William & Mary School of Education in Williamsburg, Virginia.

"I am thrilled to have the chance to engage with William & Mary students about a vital topic — ethical leadership,” Comey said in a news release. “Ethical leaders lead by seeing above the short term, above the urgent or the partisan, and with a higher loyalty to lasting values, most importantly the truth. Building and maintaining that kind of leadership, in both the private sector and government, is the challenge of our time.”

>> Reports: Trump's controversial decisions in office under scrutiny by Mueller

Comey ran the Richmond, Virginia, division of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Virginia f om 1996 to 2001, according to the Richmond Times-Dispatch. During that time, he also worked as an adjunct law professor at the University of Richmond, the news site reported.

President Barack Obama appointed Comey as director of the FBI in September 2013.

He faced criticism during and after the 2016 presidential election for his handling of an FBI investigation into former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server during her time in office. His decision to release a letter to Congress informing lawmakers of newly uncovered Clinton emails just weeks before the election had a strong impact on the vote, according to analysts.

>> Related: FBI opens investigation into new Clinton emails

Comey said two days before the election that nothing new or incriminating was found in the emails.

Comey was fired by Trump amid an ongoing investigation into alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election and its possible ties to Trump campaign officials.

>> Related: Trump tweets: 'I am being investigated for firing the FBI director'

In congressional testimony, Comey said he felt the president tried to get him to drop an investigation into former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, who was forced to resign less than a month into his tenure after it was revealed that he lied to Vice President Mike Pence about his contact with Russian officials.

>> Related: Read James Comey’s complete testimony before the Senate committee

The White House denied that the dismissal was related to the Russia investigation, although Trump later told NBC News that he had “this Russia thing” on his mind when making the decision.

Comey earned his bachelor’s degree in chemistry and religion at William & Mary in 1982.

Betsy DeVos: Common Core is dead at U.S. Department of Education

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos gave a far-ranging speech today in Washington at an American Enterprise Institute conference, “Bush-Obama School Reform: Lessons Learned.”

>> Read more trending news 

She announced the death of Common Core, at least in her federal agency.

DeVos also decried the federal government’s initiatives to improve education. “We saw two presidents from different political parties and philosophies take two different approaches. Federally mandated assessments. Federal money. Federal standards. All originated in Washington, and none solved the problem. Too many of America’s students are still unprepared,” she said.

And she touched on a favorite topic, school choice.

“Choice in education is not when a student picks a different classroom in this building or that building, uses this voucher or that tax-credit scholarship. Choice in education is bigger than that. Those are just mechanisms,” she said. “It’s about freedom to learn. Freedom to learn differently. Freedom to explore. Freedom to fail, to learn from falling and to get back up and try again. It’s freedom to find the best way to learn and grow… to find the exciting and engaging combination that unlocks individual potential.”

Read DeVos’s speech at MyAJC.com.

Flu outbreak forces an entire school district in Oklahoma to cancel classes for rest of week

An entire Oklahoma school district canceled classes Wednesday through Friday after schools reported excessive flu absences among much of the staff.

>> Read more trending news 

Morris Public Schools said Monday's absences were at 20 percent, and Tuesday's were at more than 30 percent.

Basketball teams will continue competition in the county tournament.

Wrestlers will need to contact the coach about scheduled meets.

The district asks that ill students stay home when school resumes.

Florida students translate message in bottle from German kindergartners

High school media specialist David Richards was walking on the beach in northeast Florida with his father when they found a bottle in the sand.

>> Read more trending news

“We were looking at it and we're like, ‘Whoa.’ We saw the cork was still in and the barnacles and we saw the message and said, ‘This is really rad,’” Richards said.

The message was written in German, so he brought it to Ponte Vedra High School's German Club so they could help him translate it.

“It took kind of long because we had to look through to try to read it,” student Sydney Vitti said.

“We were able to make out the name of the kindergarten,” student Jennifer Balestra said.

“It comes from a kindergarten school in Germany, (a) small town (called) Altenkirchen,” Richards said.

German Club sponsor Christina Waugh speaks fluent German and was able to help the students read the message.

“They had read a book about a message in a bottle so they all decided to do it,” Waugh said.

Waugh was able to make contact with the school's leaders in Germany.

“She couldn’t believe someone had found the bottle three and a half years later and it didn’t break in the ocean,” Waugh said.

Shortly after the phone call, the school in Germany sent them pictures and a letter.

“We’re still all so surprised that our bottle was found so far away,” Waugh said.

The students said it’s an experience they’ll always remember.

The students want to keep in contact with the school so they're sending a care package and writing letters to the students there.

Florida teacher donates kidney to student’s mother

Donna Hoagland wasn’t even supposed to be Troy Volk’s fourth-grade teacher -- she was just filling in while his regular teacher was on maternity leave -- but the two are forever linked, now that she gave a kidney that’s keeping his mother alive.

>> Read more trending news

Hoagland knew enough to ask what was wrong when the young math fanatic was too distracted to answer basic questions in his Florida elementary school class.

His answer sometimes came through tears. His mom was sick. He didn’t know if she was going to get better.

“A lot of days, he looked like the weight of the world was on his shoulders,” Hoagland said.

She did what teachers do and asked Troy’s mom Anahita to come in for a conference. But Hoagland was who walked away with homework, researching kidney donations, something she’d considered for a friend.

Volk promised to share some reading material, thinking Volk’s friend was lucky. It turns out, however, that the friend was too sick to be a candidate and unbeknownst to Volk, the teacher had another idea.

Whenever Troy kept asking his mom “What if you don’t get a kidney?” she’d assure him she’d live to see him grow up, go to college, become a CEO and get married. She’s been “sick mommy” for nearly half of Troy’s life.

As much as Volk tried to shield Troy and his younger brother Armaan from her condition, downplay its severity, she couldn’t.

She was hooked up to a dialysis machine every night. She couldn’t cuddle with her boys to watch a movie or for a bedtime story. She couldn’t jump into the pool with them. And in the morning, she’d wake up, retching in the bathroom before school.

“It breaks your heart that you’re the one who is supposed to be taking care of them and they’re the ones taking care of you,” Volk said.

Symptoms of her illness began late in her pregnancy with Troy, but doctors weren’t able to identify a cause. She was sluggish, but they brushed it off as anemia.

Her pregnancy with Troy’s brother tipped doctors off to the kidney disease. Her obstetrician told her she should end the pregnancy and predicted she’d never be able to have more children. She and her husband Joseph insisted — after a second opinion from her kidney doctor — that their second son would be born.

By the time Armaan was a year old, she was in the final stages of kidney failure -- and not one of her large extended family members was a match, not even her sister.

Volk is amazed to get a kidney within a few years of her diagnosis, knowing that people have died on a waiting list.

Volk said she was merely joking when she asked Hoagland at a parent-teacher conference last December if she wanted to give her a kidney. The mom sent Hoagland information, thinking she’d use it to research how to donate to her high school friend fighting cancer.

It turns out he is still too sick for a transplant. Hoagland’s kidney was destined for Volk. After spring break, Hoagland told Volk she wanted to be tested as a match.

“I was flabbergasted. I was like ‘No, are you serious?! I was in total disbelief,” Volk said.

They were compatible. Volk was at Troy’s boxing club in September when his teacher called her with the good news.

“I just fell to the ground and started crying in the middle of the parking lot,” Volk said.

Troy, now 10, was stunned.

“We all went crazy about it. Finding out it was my teacher — shocking. It was shocking. I was blown away,” Troy said.

He says he’s looking forward to waging Super Soaker battles and jumping into the pool with his mom again.

Not wanting to disrupt her students’ lives, Hoagland scheduled the surgery for the winter break. Doctors at University of Florida Health’s Shands Hospital in Gainesville removed Hoagland’s kidney and hooked it up in Volk days before Christmas.

The new kidney started working almost immediately, Volk said. She has more energy than ever before and can’t sleep at night if she doesn’t walk at least two miles a day, she said.

Her doctor told her Thursday that her one kidney is working as well as his two. She tells Hoagland “I got your super kidney.”

The story was featured on Steve Hartman’s “On the Road” segment for CBS Evening News Jan. 5. Hoagland said she’s happy to have done something to make her 21-year-old daughter and 18-year-old twins proud, but she seems unfazed by the attention.

“Three weeks out of my life to sacrifice, to be a little bit uncomfortable, to help her have a normal, healthy life is nothing to ask,” Hoagland said. “She never asked me for my kidney. I just kind of said, ‘Hey, I can give you mine.’”

Volk is blown away by the gift of life and the second chance with her boys that Hoagland has given her.

“The amazing amount of selflessness this woman has is inspiring,” she said.

Ohio teacher under fire for ‘lynching’ comment to black student

An Ohio social studies teacher who told a black middle school student he might get “lynched” by his classmates if he did not focus on his schoolwork is under fire by the boy’s mother, who wants the educator removed from the class.

>> Read more trending news

School officials confirmed that Renee Thole, who is white and teaches at a school in suburban Cincinnati, admitted making the racially insensitive remark to the 13-year-old student on Dec. 4 at Mason Middle School, ABC News reported.

Thole was not fired, but was reprimanded and ordered to take cultural sensitivity training, The Washington Post reported.

That’s not enough for the boy’s mother, Tanisha Agee-Bell.

“I want her removed from the classroom until she can get the proper training,” Agee-Bell told ABC News.

Agee-Bell said her son told her about Thole’s comment, which occurred in front of his classmates, on Dec. 12. She immediately emailed the teacher and then spoke to her on the phone, demanding an apology in front of his classmates, ABC News reported.

“He was in class and the teacher told him that if he didn’t get on task his friends are going to form an angry mob and lynch you,” Agee-Bell told ABC News. “When she said that, he said back to her, 'That’s racist,’ She approached him and said, ‘Why do you think that’s racist? I would never do anything to hurt you.’”

According to the NAACP website, there were 4,743 lynchings in the United States from 1882 to 1968. Of that number, 3,446 were black.

Tracey Carson, a spokeswoman for the Mason School District, confirmed that Thole had made the comment.

“She immediately recognized she had done something wrong,” Carson told ABC News.

The letter of reprimand read in part, “You shared that you realized that you cannot take that moment back but can only strive to make it a teachable moment for you and the students with your actions.”

The teacher did apologize to the teen on Dec. 13. Agee-Bell had her son removed from Thole’s class, WCPO reported.

Agee-Bell said she was not convinced that the teacher understood the gravity of her words.

"I told her, ‘The fact that you’re a social studies teacher and you don’t understand the racial implications of what you said to my son baffles me,’” Agee-Bell told ABC News.

While Thole has not commented publicly, according to her incident summary she wrote that she made a comment “where I didn’t stop and think before I spoke. As a result of that I deeply hurt a student and I regret that.”

Police stand guard as ‘White Racism’ class opens at Florida university

A Florida university placed campus police outside a sociology class called “White Racism” after its professor was flooded with harassing emails and messages -- some of them openly racist, CNN reported.

>> Read more trending news

Tuesday was the first day of the spring semester and there were no incidents reported in the class taught by Ted Thornhill, an assistant professor at Florida Gulf Coast University. The course was announced last fall and sparked reaction, much of it negative, CNN reported.

“I think most of us don't anticipate there being any unrest or protest or anything like that," Thornhill told the News-Press of Fort Myers. “But it's more of a prudent measure to have law enforcement present just in case."

“All that it takes is that one person to act on their views,” Thornhill, who is black, told CNN. “We've got to be cautious because you don't know what people are capable of.”

According to the course description, the class will “interrogate the concept of race; examine the racist ideologies, laws, policies, and practices that have operated for hundreds of years to maintain white racial domination over those racialized as non-white.” It also will “discuss ways to challenge white racism and white supremacy toward promoting an anti-racist society where whiteness is not tied to greater life chances.”

Thornhill said he decided to title the course “White Racism” because he believes it accurately signifies the material.

“I understood that many white Americans, and some people of color, would find it provocative,” he told CNN.

The professor said he wasn't surprised when he was besieged with messages -- most of them negative -- and some hate mail in the days and weeks after the course was announced. 

He said he was shocked by the reaction but was not backing down.

“It is not my job to provide white people with comfort,” he told CNN.

Thornhill said his course is about a search for truth.

“My White Racism course is not anti-white; it is anti-white racism," he said in a written statement sent to CNN and other news outlets. “Clearly, not all white people are racists; some are even anti-racist. However, all people racialized as white derive, in some measure, material and psychological benefits by virtue of being racialized as white.”

Mother sues school district over voicemail mocking special needs daughter

A Pennsylvania mother is suing a local school district, claiming teachers mocked her daughter, who has disabilities.

>> Read more trending news

“She could coal mine ... She could be a good coal miner!”

“She has a pretty smile. Her teeth are crooked!”

“She can walk!”

Those are some of the insults that were allegedly left in a voicemail on Beth Suhon's phone. The voices on the other end allegedly are her daughter’s former Claysville Elementary School teachers..

“They have no respect for children, especially children with special needs,” Suhon said.

A teacher initially called Suhon in February 2015 to inform her that her daughter was struggling in school. But he never properly hung up the phone and continued to talk.

“It was very difficult for me to tell my child who has been bullied by her peers for years that she was now being bullied by her teachers,” Suhon said. “Adults can be bullies too.”

Suhon's daughter has Turner's Syndrome, which causes developmental and learning issues. She says she never would have thought the people she trusted with her child would act like this.

Suhon is suing Washington County's McGuffey School District in federal court.

She claims the school district discriminated against her child, retaliated when she addressed the issues and even wrongfully got rid of her daughter's special needs plan.

Suhon hopes the teachers learn a lesson.

“I would like for the school district to acknowledge that they have teachers that obviously need counseling,” she said.

Suhon is also asking for damages, but said an amount has not yet been discussed.

Service dog joins college graduate during ceremony

A college graduate in Texas walked the stage to receive her diploma on Saturday, accompanied by the service dog who served as her inspiration.

>> Read more trending news

Taylor Dearman graduated from Texas A&M-Corpus Christi, and she celebrated her milestone with Skittles, a dog she met while in Georgia, KRIS reported.

They were paired together almost four years ago when Dearman began experiencing anxiety, depression and seizures. Because of that, Dearman had been forced to drop out of Texas A&M -Corpus Christi, where she had been studying nursing. She moved to Georgia to be close to her parents, and when she applied for a service dog, Skittles came into her life.

“It was so bad that I had to quit school and take a year off,” Dearman told Inside Edition. “With (Skittles) I haven’t had a seizure.” 

The dog also became an inspiration.

“It kind of, ya know, really pushed me to become an educator because every day I got to educate someone about having a dog," Dearman told KRIS. “Others had commented ‘You're not disabled, you aren't in a wheelchair.' and (she) said, 'Just because you can't see it, doesn't mean there's (not) something that could be wrong.’”

Skittles also has accompanied Dearman to her student teaching courses.

"My students, they get to learn about her every single day. And I'm teaching, and I'm doing what I love and I get to inspire our future, which is amazing," Dearman told KRIS.

Now that she's graduated, Dearman plans to pursue a job as a fifth-grade reading teacher, KRIS reported.

Grandmother, granddaughter graduate together from college

For the first time in its 150-year history, Chicago State University awarded diplomas to a grandmother and granddaughter during the same ceremony, WLS reported.

>> Read more trending news

Belinda Berry, 62, and Karea Berry, 25, both walked across the stage at the Jones Convocation Center on Thursday to accept their diplomas. 

Grandma graduated at the top of her class with a 3.8 grade-point average in business. Her granddaughter Karea Berry earned her bachelor’s degree in criminal justice, WLS reported. 

Both plan to pursue their master’s degrees.

"It was never planned, we both enrolled in school and we didn't know we were going to finish together because I was full-time and she was part-time, and it just worked out that way," Karea Berry said.

Belinda Berry walked first, followed by Karea Berry.

"I have always stressed that education is power,” said Belinda Berry, who went back to school part-time to improve her employment prospects. “I am very honored to be a role model and I hope that I am an inspiration to the young as well as the old, because it is never too late to pursue an education.”

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >